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    In  For Love I disappear / Per l’amore io sparisco,  this installation of scroll-printed woodblocks is a diaristic memorial in a form reminiscent to wallpaper. The scrolls begin hanging flat at the top of the wall, then emerge undulating outward. In their spatial and frozen undulation, the scrolls are supported by a simple apparatus that mimics methods of drying freshly-printed wallpaper, also referencing the manner in which butterflies dry their wings after emergence from the chrysalis. The imagery printed on these scrolls are the wings of a butterfly and of a dragonfly, paying close attention to their physical and behavioral self-defense mechanisms. Both sets of appendages are perforated and burdened with repetitions of the knuckleduster symbol. In the case of the butterfly, the ocelli (or eyespots) found on the backside of a blue-morpho butterfly are patterned into the shape of the knuckleduster weapon. The dragonfly’s wings are repeatedly perforated with the knuckleduster finger-hole pattern, suggesting an inability to fly. 
       
     
iosparisco02.jpg
       
     
iosparisco04.jpg
       
     
iosparisco05.jpg
       
     
iosparsco06.jpg
       
     
iosparisco07.jpg
       
     
iosparisco08.jpg
       
     
iosparisco09.jpg
       
     
   
  
 
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    In  For Love I disappear / Per l’amore io sparisco,  this installation of scroll-printed woodblocks is a diaristic memorial in a form reminiscent to wallpaper. The scrolls begin hanging flat at the top of the wall, then emerge undulating outward. In their spatial and frozen undulation, the scrolls are supported by a simple apparatus that mimics methods of drying freshly-printed wallpaper, also referencing the manner in which butterflies dry their wings after emergence from the chrysalis. The imagery printed on these scrolls are the wings of a butterfly and of a dragonfly, paying close attention to their physical and behavioral self-defense mechanisms. Both sets of appendages are perforated and burdened with repetitions of the knuckleduster symbol. In the case of the butterfly, the ocelli (or eyespots) found on the backside of a blue-morpho butterfly are patterned into the shape of the knuckleduster weapon. The dragonfly’s wings are repeatedly perforated with the knuckleduster finger-hole pattern, suggesting an inability to fly. 
       
     

In For Love I disappear / Per l’amore io sparisco, this installation of scroll-printed woodblocks is a diaristic memorial in a form reminiscent to wallpaper. The scrolls begin hanging flat at the top of the wall, then emerge undulating outward. In their spatial and frozen undulation, the scrolls are supported by a simple apparatus that mimics methods of drying freshly-printed wallpaper, also referencing the manner in which butterflies dry their wings after emergence from the chrysalis. The imagery printed on these scrolls are the wings of a butterfly and of a dragonfly, paying close attention to their physical and behavioral self-defense mechanisms. Both sets of appendages are perforated and burdened with repetitions of the knuckleduster symbol. In the case of the butterfly, the ocelli (or eyespots) found on the backside of a blue-morpho butterfly are patterned into the shape of the knuckleduster weapon. The dragonfly’s wings are repeatedly perforated with the knuckleduster finger-hole pattern, suggesting an inability to fly. 

iosparisco02.jpg
       
     
iosparisco04.jpg
       
     
iosparisco05.jpg
       
     
iosparsco06.jpg
       
     
iosparisco07.jpg
       
     
iosparisco08.jpg
       
     
iosparisco09.jpg